Ride service company Uber announced Thursday that it has pulled out of another Northwest market.

Boise Weekly reports that at noon, drivers powered down the app and stopped accepting rides from Boise, Idaho residents after operating in the city for almost five months.

“We’ve also worked closely with the City of Boise to craft new regulations that recognize the unique nature of ridesharing and put consumer choice and safety first,” said Bryce Bennett, Uber general manager in a statement. “But after months of good-faith negotiations with the Mayor and city leaders, we find ourselves at an impasse.”

City officials proposed new rules at a Wednesday meeting, stating that Uber and other non-taxi services would be held to similar regulations as taxi companies. The alternative news weekly reports that Uber was not invited to the meeting.

The city had banned Uber drivers from charging riders because the company had not followed city rules. Uber has ignored the no-cost-for-rides rule in the past. When drivers started accepting fares during New Year’s Eve, the city of Boise issued a cease-and-desist order against the company. Uber said it had to foot the bill for drivers’ wages.

“Steep and growing costs that come from offering thousands of free rides combined with unworkable and onerous regulations being proposed by the City leave Uber no other choice than to suspend operations in Boise for the foreseeable future,” wrote Bennett.

The company has had its fair share of problems in Oregon markets as well. Portland also issued a cease-and-desist order against Uber in December for not complying with city code. The company agreed to stop operations in the city until April while the city updates local laws.

Eugene and Salem both issued warnings to the company that it must have a business license before it can accept riders. Oregon’s Capital has since eased up, and is considering changes to local laws that would allow non-taxi ride services.